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What Happened To The Nautilus?
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9,895,911 Views • Apr 12, 2024 • Click to toggle off description
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For centuries, the North Pole remained elusive. Early attempts to reach it were primarily motivated by the search for a navigable route through the Arctic to Asia, known as the Northwest Passage. Later, explorers focused specifically on reaching the Pole itself. But for centuries, reaching it seemed impossible. The polar environment was extremely unforgiving. Located in the middle of the Arctic Ocean, the North Pole is covered by a vast expanse of sea ice which constantly changes due to wind, ocean currents and seasonal melts. Explorers tried to reach the pole using ships, dogsleds, and even traveling by foot. The first verified, and officially recognized expedition to reach the North Pole didn’t occur until 1926 (although several explorers claimed to have reached it earlier). It was first reached using the airship Norge, which flew overhead, but did not land on the surface.

In the late 1920’s, accomplished explorer Sir Hubert Wilkins became convinced that a submarine would provide the ultimate means of reaching the North Pole. A submarine could travel for extended periods beneath the ice, avoiding the extreme hazards above which had caused earlier expeditions to fail. Carrying the latest scientific equipment, the submarine’s crew could conduct valuable meteorological, oceanographic, biological, magnetic, and spectrographic experiments.

Wilkin’s submarine would be called the Nautilus. It was a retired WW1-era submarine that had been extensively modified by renowned Naval Architect Simon Lake. The Nautilus featured a heavily reinforced bow, a shock absorber and sledge runners to protect it from collision with sea ice. A diving compartment and airlock was also added to allow divers to explore the depths while the submarine remained submerged. Most importantly, the Nautilus was fitted with three ice drills, allowing the submarine to recharge batteries, refresh air and even allow the crew to exit while the submarine still remained below the ice.

The Nautilus and her crew of 20 men began their expedition to the North Pole in June of 1931.
None of them realized how grueling their journey would be, and almost immediately things began to go wrong.
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Views : 9,895,911
Genre: Education
Date of upload: Apr 12, 2024 ^^


Rating : 4.972 (1,287/183,238 LTDR)

99.30% of the users lieked the video!!
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User score: 98.95- Masterpiece Video

RYD date created : 2024-07-19T15:51:28.03394Z
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YouTube Comments - 3,497 Comments

Top Comments of this video!! :3

@RaYmOnDrOiD

3 months ago

Bro saw the current state of the history channel and said: ”Fine, I’ll do it myself.”

13K |

@Wangpi3ce

3 months ago

6:50 "Mechanical issues be damned, it was time to get going." That isn't a phrase you want to hear on any vehicle, much less a submarine planning to journey under an ice sheet. I wonder if they told the crew about that particular detail before they set off?

3.4K |

@GC_Rallo

2 months ago

The fact he was largely forgotten is a shame. Regardless of the fact they didn't make it to the poles, those men ventured further than anyone else and put up a record that took nearly 30 years to beat, and making that kind of trip with unproven, experimental, 1930's tech in a WWI era sub is just fucking terrifying. The phrase "We stand on the shoulders of giants" comes to mind.

964 |

@Jake-jd7bd

3 months ago

My grandfather was on the Skate in the 50s when the two subs (2nd sub being the "new" Nautilus) went out to surface through the polar ice for the first time. He was one of four civilians on board and even got a spot in the arctic named after him. My grandmother never really knew what he was doing since it was so secretive during the cold War. Family didn't even find out till many years later once things started being declassified after 25 and then 50 years later.

380 |

@SirAaronFox

3 months ago

I am sorry but that thumbnail is f*cking incredible!

20K |

@StunningHistory

3 months ago

“How does the rudder look?” “Invisible, sir.”

3.1K |

@0therun1t21

3 months ago

This thing fills me with dread, I can't believe anyone got on board. Under the ice is no place to be, not even for one second. 12:14 Aw hell no!

484 |

@YoUnOkNoWoK

3 months ago

What’s wrong with this world is that people only care if you succeed and people don’t care about you if you fail(your just forgotten) such a sad world.

412 |

@NobleOmnicide

3 months ago

This is the type of content I wish YouTube would promote. This channel continues to publish some of the best content on the internet. Hands down.

7.5K |

@mikestrohm3271

3 months ago

I have surfaced through the polar ice on three occasions with Royal Navy subs and those were fraught with danger so to see someone attempt the same nearly 100 years ago is breathtaking. The fact that this boat used diesels, which needed air to operate, was incredibly risky as coming across a polynia could be very hit and miss without upward looking sonar to aid discovery of an area of open water.

2.9K |

@masonwagner768

2 months ago

Wow. An incredible channel consisting almost entirely of nothing but high quality videos diving into my special interest; the design and engineering behind unique forms of travel. You've even got a video on airships! I'm seriously so excited. I can't wait to burn through your youtube catalogue and then give Nebula a shot. Thanks for the quality content, you really made my day!

25 |

@MackBree12

3 months ago

Bro u snapped!!!! This was such a dope vid!!!! Super informative!

19 |

@B1lly_

3 months ago

06:24 it's amazing how in just 6-7 decades, pole-exploring submarine went from "cannot go out far from port without breaking down a lot" into "body-crashing thru sea ice by simply surfacing".

1.6K |

@paleoph6168

3 months ago

1:47 These illustrations are wonderful! It's like looking at an actual book.

1.7K |

@VarshinK

3 months ago

What an incredible find this channel is, that was fascinating and soooo very well put. Thank you for this. I'm hooked now🙌

33 |

@alanguillermo3145

1 week ago

This whole story feels like one of those really tense and depressing movies with a complicated and sympathetic protagonist. I understand why Wilkins would press on and the pressure he was under. But it was dangerous and irresponsible to press on as far as he did. What a great video!

6 |

@Goldenwing117

3 months ago

MUSTARD!!!! No Ketchup Needed

4.1K |

@squidwardfromua

3 months ago

Bros were among the last ones who couldn't say "I'm too late to explore Earth and too early to explore space" Glad they survived

2.5K |

@gwendolyn0515

3 months ago

I can't believe this is free to watch, thank you so much!

9 |

@egawe

2 months ago

Your content blows my mind! Continue please!

9 |

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